As predicted before the Bank Bailouts:

In an acceleration of a trend that has been underway since the early 1990s, the U.S. lost 932 financial institutions or nearly 13 percent of the total since the onset of the Great Recession, according to the latest data from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The vast majority of those closed institutions had less than $1 billion in assets. They were mostly locally-owned, community banks that were often the backbone of small business lending in their communities.

On the other end of the spectrum, the top 106 banking institutions – those with over $10 billion in assets – now hold nearly 80 percent of the nation’s $13.8 trillion in financial wealth. The 116 institutions that qualified as mega-banks in 2007 held just 77 percent of $12.7 trillion in assets. There’s no chance that the trend will reverse itself since there has been an almost total collapse of new applications for bank charters. In the past year there were even two quarters when there were zero applications – an unprecedented event in the 77-year history of the FDIC.

As I wrote in 2008:

Real leadership would have sought to aggressively address the root cause by cutting back on further borrowing, unnecessary spending, easy credit and wasteful excesses. Congress deformed not just authentic prosperity in the near future but for the next fifty years. The market will be plagued with higher unemployment, rising costs of goods: long-term stagflation. In addition, Congress has directed us toward domination by a few huge universal banks and a small number of gigantic corporations, all of them “too big to fail,” under the careful tutelage of a governmental Leviathon dominated by these same cartels.

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