Joey Kennedy reports on Retirement Systems of Alabama’s chief David Bronner’s opinion of HB56:

The bankruptcy’s effect on the county will be negligible compared to the effects of the state’s new immigration law, said David Bronner. The imigration law effectively hangs a sign on the county that tells Hispanics and other immigrants ‘we might not be welcome’ in Alabama, he said.

Kennedy continues his interview with Bronner with the following:

What bothers Bronner as much as anything is that Alabama decided to be the “tip of the spear” in the states’-rights immigration fight. “What they did was put our state in the position of being by ourselves, and everybody watching,” he says. “We don’t need that considering our history with the civil rights era. We don’t need to be there. We need to be in the back, working on our growth.”

Bronner is never reluctant to say what’s on his mind.

“We accomplish nothing but hurt ourselves,” Bronner says. “If we would have passed an immigration law that was softer — we could have done anything less than Arizona — and sent a message to Washington, we could have made the locals happy but we didn’t have to be the poster child.

“Not only do we get all the abuse, we lose industry and we get to pay the big legal bills. For what? If you’re just blowing smoke, beating on your chest, what are you accomplishing?”

Bronner says folks who don’t think the immigration law won’t have a huge impact on industrial recruiting are in denial. Industrial recruiting is a brutal game.

“Anytime a state screws up, or a governor says something bad, we use it,” says Bronner. ” When we were recruiting Hyundai against Kentucky, anytime we could find something Kentucky did bad, we made sure Hyundai found out about it.

“That’s the way it works,” he says.

So, yeah, Bronner says. The immigration law is much worse than Jefferson County’s bankruptcy as far as industrial recruiting. At some point, Jefferson County will come out from bankruptcy. But we may be stuck with this destructive immigration law from here on.

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